12 June 2019

The Time Is Now for Health Systems to Get Serious About Social Determinants of Health




A fundamental question continuing to face many health system executives is: How do we comprehensively address the needs of patients when those needs extend beyond the boundaries of traditional clinical care?  As President and CEO of PCCI, we have been focusing on this very challenge since 2012.  And while there has been much talk and excitement about social determinants of health (SDOH), we believe that ~90% of the health system market still does not leverage social/economic information when designing population health programs, developing patient-specific treatment plans, locating new services, or conducting community needs assessments. But before health system executives can design an effective SDOH strategy for their organizations, they must first assess where they are and where they would like to be based on the insights and advantages a progressive SDOH strategy would offer. PCCI’s Social Determinants of Health Maturity Model can help executives take this critical step.

Social Determinants of Health Maturity Model

Level Zero: Incomplete Picture of an Individual’s Environment

Realistically, this is the starting baseline for most organizations. Often, teams will attempt to use clinical and claims data ALONE as a means to segment patient populations and project the impact on a patient or cohort. This rarely works; rather, it often leads to late treatment in acute environments, sub-optimal interventions, and erroneous insights about specific patients, patient populations, or geographic markets.

Level 1: High-Level View of SDOH, Using Specific Social and Economic Indicators as Proxies

Teams can extract basic information from claims or clinical data that could serve as effective SDOH proxies. An example would be to look at the number of changes in addresses in a specific record, over a 12-month period, as a strong indicator of housing instability.  At the highest level, teasing out information from existing records can begin to illuminate some of the critical social and economic challenges that may present for individuals in a given community. This level of insight also allows health- system teams to test basic assumptions about a market. We’ve seen teams fooled when the employment level appears to be relatively stable, only to subsequently discover that much of the employment is via low-wage jobs with very poor benefits.  If you begin to see that people are moving around even though the employment statistic looks stable, you begin to realize that the actual stability of your community might not be what you perceived it to be.

If at Level 1, Leadership Teams Should Be:

  • Developing high-level proxy indicators to reflect underlying social and economic challenges that could play a significant role in health status or the ability to access services.
  • Understanding the payer mix; who you serve and, even within the insured population, understand the wage/income levels because there is a high percentage of employed, low-wage individuals that have vulnerabilities associated with transportation, housing, affordable daycare, etc.
  • Becoming familiar with existing local or state connected communities of care programs or activities aligning providers and community-based organizations, such as food pantries, to streamline assistance efforts, reduce repeat crises and emergency funding requests, help address disparities of care, and improve the health, safety, and well-being of residents.

Level 2: Root Causes Understanding of Poor Outcomes at the Population Level

The rubber hits the road at level 2 and teams begin leveraging local data that directly reflect variation in social determinants. We believe that to understand root causes and build actionable models for patient engagement and support, you must evaluate data at the block level. Zip-code level aggregation often masks important details. This is particularly true in highly populated municipalities that can see a tremendous amount of social determinant variation within a 0.1 mile distance. For example, if I had block-level information providing insight that a six-block neighborhood within my market was having transportation-oriented issues and concentrated pockets of non-violent crime, I would model these insights into the deployment of my mobile diagnostic clinics or my development of innovative models to improve access.  Also, if I was discharging a patient who resided in that neighborhood, I would rethink how to schedule follow-up appointments, since the chances of the patient keeping the visits are extremely low. This level of insight and actionability would be missed at the zip-code level.

In collaboration with DFWHC Foundation, Community Council of Greater Dallas, and the University of Texas at Dallas, PCCI built a platform for Dallas called Dallas Community Data for Action and/or Community Data Insights [CDI].  CDI ingests and organizes multiple, publicly available data inputs, such as housing, education, food availability, and 911 and 311 data to generate real-time, actionable dashboards containing over 60 factors that all point to specific social determinants.  In Dallas, use of this data has been vital in understanding pockets of need and in locating areas where the impact of interventions can be the most profound.  You can also use this data more broadly to generate support to build community cross-sector collaboration, by enabling health systems to effectively  engage and coordinate with local municipality officials on community-based support services and planning, and also by helping philanthropic organizations to better understand (and track) community needs in order to invest in/prioritize funding areas that will produce the greatest impact.  In addition to having a detailed and dynamic picture of social and economic needs (demand for services), the CDI dashboard can quickly map out where support services are available/delivered and map/model the interdependencies and concentration of chronic health conditions with social support needs.  As this model is rapidly scalable, PCCI is already working with others across the country.

If at Level 2, Leadership Teams Should Be:

  • Integrating SDOH market insights into your strategic planning process and your community engagement plan
    • Use block-level SDOH in community needs assessments
  • Anticipating and predicting the correlations between multiple social and economic factors to inform your patient flow and access strategy (including your telehealth strategy). Start conducting trend analyses to anticipate and forecast the changes in local-market dynamics that will impact utilization, payer mix, and social/economic barriers to health.
  • Crafting a data-driven engagement plan to align more directly with local municipalities and local philanthropic organizations.

Level 3: Comprehensive Partnership Between a Community’s Clinical and Social Sectors

Participating organizations across a community are collaborating on one Information Exchange Platform and are connected through an innovative closed-loop referral system allowing them to communicate and share information with each other. Success at this highest level requires both a strong technology infrastructure and consistent programmatic deployment [at scale] across a community. This is what we’ve done in Dallas with our technology partners at Pieces Technology Inc.; effectively managing the right balance of people, processes, and technology has allowed us to achieve the positive results that we’ve seen.

Level 3 means a significant investment and a multi-year commitment, not only by the anchoring healthcare system or systems, but also by the local community.  It requires an initial investment and a robust sustainability plan that can ensure that the platform capabilities evolve with the changing needs of the community.  Deployment requires not only new technology, but an engaged local governance structure, new legal and data sharing agreements, and further refinement of data integration and advanced analytics at the individual level.  Integrating these into new/updated clinical and community workflows enables teams to proactively predict specific health and social/economic needs, the complexity and co-dependency of needs, and the ability to act real time at the point of care to address these needs.  This can facilitate making real-time referrals for community support services, tracking whether individuals accessed suggested medical or community resources (and what specific services were provided), and measuring and tracking the impact to individual/community resiliency, self-sustainability, health outcomes, and cost.  In Dallas, we’ve also started to leverage advanced data algorithms to risk-stratify individuals based on their health and social/economic needs to better prioritize and tailor resources and to proactively target high-risk individuals for engagement and follow-up via digital technology.

At levels 2 and 3, a health system must also think about how to leverage its foundation resources and internal employee community-outreach volunteer programs.  Once you better understand the patients that you’re serving in your market and the community-based services they access, you can better deploy employee-based efforts and philanthropic activities that align with the strategic efforts and provide maximal impact.

If at Level 3, Leadership Teams Should Be:

  • Crafting the information exchange platform governance infrastructure to delineate key roles, essential participants, and shared objectives.
  • Committing to cross-community collaboration [potentially including competitors] and a long-term effort; recognizing that your health system might be an anchor organization, but it cannot independently solve the entire problem.
  • Selecting and deploying the technology infrastructure [Pieces Iris™, TAVHealth, Unite Us, etc.] to enable cross-community engagement.  Develop updated clinical and community-based workflows.

In summary, if you’re just starting to address SDOH, you’re late.  It is critical for health systems to begin their SDOH journey today, especially if you serve a vulnerable population and/or operate in a market dominated by uninsured and Medicaid patients.  Addressing SDOH is also equally important for organizations managing a lower-wage, commercially insured population and for any health system that is actively managing or considering taking on risk-based contracts.

If you’re well on your way up the SDOH curve and actively integrating SDOH into your strategic and care-delivery models, then start working on new models to bridge social isolation (physical and mental) and to better understand (and develop strategies to address) challenging behaviors, including chronic helplessness.

To learn more about our Dallas journey, please visit our website and see what our team of PCCI experts is doing to make a difference or visit our technology partners at Pieces Technology to experience the Pieces IRIS™ technology.

27 March 2019

PCCI names new Chief Funding and Innovation Officer




Brings decades of healthcare strategy, innovation management to organization

DALLAS – Leslie Wainwright, PhD has been named Chief Funding and Innovation Officer for the Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI).

“We are very excited to welcome Dr. Wainwright to PCCI. Leslie’s experience in working with strategy leaders, innovation executives and philanthropic organizations will be instrumental in PCCI reaching its full potential of advancing artificial intelligence and addressing social determinants of health. Leslie will be integral to the organization as it continues to expand solutions to support healthier communities and a great asset to the PCCI leadership team,” said PCCI’s President and CEO, Steve Miff, PhD.

Dr. Wainwright brings 20 years of experience in healthcare strategy and innovation management to PCCI. She comes from RTI International, a global nonprofit research institution, where she led the Innovation Advisor Health Sector Practice and worked with health systems and technology companies to accelerate the development of high-impact innovations. Through executive roles at Sg2 and AVIA, Dr. Wainwright has worked with some of the largest and most influential organizations in healthcare and has assisted leadership teams structure strategically-aligned innovation programs that are economically self-sustainable. She is a frequent national and international speaker on enabling technologies, disruptive innovation and emerging healthcare business models.

Dr. Wainwright will focus her efforts on expanding PCCI’s innovation research and development network across the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex and nationally. In addition, she will work with organizations and communities outside of Dallas to accelerate and broaden the impact and development of new and innovative solutions. With deep roots in Chicago and established national relationships she hopes to tap into the same philanthropic and community spirit that has benefitted PCCI and the healthcare community so greatly in Dallas. Dr. Wainwright will divide her time between PCCI’s Dallas office and Chicago.

About PCCI
PCCI is an independent, not-for-profit, healthcare intelligence organization affiliated with Parkland Health & Hospital System. PCCI focuses on creating connected communities through data science and cutting-edge technologies like machine learning. PCCI combines extensive clinical expertise with advanced analytics and artificial intelligence to enable the delivery of patient-centric precision medicine at the point of care.

Contact
PCCI
Esther Olsen
214-590-4446
Esther.olsen@pccinnovation.org

1 October 2018

Parkland RITE program targets prevention of hospital infections and improved sepsis care




Hospital-wide effort reduces infection rates, saves lives

DALLAS —Each year sepsis strikes approximately 1.7 million people in the U.S. and more than a quarter million die from the condition, making it a major cause of death. Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) contribute to about 25 percent of these deaths. According to infection prevention experts, many hospitals are trying different approaches to reduce healthcare-associated infections, improve care of patients presenting with sepsis, and save lives. In 2013, Parkland Health & Hospital System launched an innovative hospital-wide program to reduce HAI and sepsis-related deaths, called RITE (Reduce Infections Together in Everyone).

In the first five years, the multi-disciplinary program has achieved impressive results, reducing rates of infection each year since the program was launched. The net estimated impact of the RITE program is more than a thousand infections prevented and approximately $17,781,000 in cost avoidance.

“Providing quality care begins with providing safe care,” said Parkland’s Chief of Infection Prevention, Pranavi Sreeramoju, MD. “We targeted catheter-associated urinary tract infections and central line-associated blood stream infections hospital-wide, surgical site infections following eighteen different types of surgical procedures, and patients presenting with signs and symptoms of sepsis to our emergency department.”

Parkland’s prevention approach centered on standardizing care of patients at risk for these complications; engaging healthcare personnel by talking to them and exploring barriers to adoption of best practice; standardizing curriculum on how to prevent HAI and improve sepsis care; use of medical informatics tools such as early warning system for sepsis developed by Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation; use of best practice alerts and order sets in the electronic medical records; and improving workflows.

According to Dr. Sreeramoju who is also Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center, Parkland’s RITE initiative forged a new approach to prevention by leaning on one part medical science and two parts social science.

“It’s been said about infection prevention that we know what to do – that’s the medical science. The biggest challenge for hospitals remains getting everyone to do the right thing, all the time,” she said. “Something as basic as hand hygiene requires constant vigilance in a hospital setting. So we decided to focus on identifying the most effective ways to influence behavior and make best practices easier to adhere to.

“We took a ‘high touch’ approach to working with staff, spending time analyzing interactions among multi-disciplinary caregivers, and we gave front-line staff the opportunity to provide input that could help us improve our infection prevention strategies,” Dr. Sreeramoju explained.

The scope of the RITE initiative is massive. Parkland Memorial Hospital has more than 40,000 inpatient discharges and 244,000 emergency department visits annually. Approximately 2,500 patients present to Parkland’s ED with suspected sepsis each year.

During Sepsis Awareness Month in September, organizations like the Sepsis Alliance, one of the nation’s leading sepsis patient advocacy groups, hope to increase public and healthcare professionals’ knowledge about this dangerous and vexing health risk. In a 2016 report, the Sepsis Alliance stated that “even though hospitalizations are increasing, a majority of Americans still don’t know what sepsis is or how to treat it.” The most recent Sepsis Alliance Awareness Survey found that less than one-half of all adult Americans have ever heard of sepsis. And the number is even lower among younger adults.

To learn more about services at Parkland hospital, visit www.parklandhospital.com

Contact

Parkland Health & Hospital System
Catherine Bradley
469-419-4400 catherine.bradley@phhs.org

PCCI
Lindsey Nace
214-590-3887 lindsey.nace@PCCInnovation.org

16 May 2018

PCCI’s Innovation Bridge Opens at Parkland’s Hatcher Station Health Center




Enabling patients to connect to digital technology to better manage their own health

Dallas, TX –The Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) in collaboration with Parkland Health & Hospital System has deployed the Innovation Bridge at the Hatcher Station Health Center. Serving residents of East Dallas, Hatcher Station is one of 12 Community Oriented Primary Care centers (COPCs) operated by Parkland throughout Dallas County. Taking inspiration from the Apple Genius Bar and Ochsner Health System’s O Bar, the Innovation Bridge is designed to bridge the technology divide for patients and caregivers.

Although there are a number of mobile apps in the marketplace that claim to help patients manage a variety of different health conditions, many are not vetted by clinicians or targeted for vulnerable patients. PCCI’s Innovation Bridge was developed by Parkland and PCCI physicians in collaboration with IT experts.

“We are very excited to launch and test the impact of this innovative concept,” said Steve Miff, PhD, President and CEO, Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation. “New technology can be intimidating, so we aim to use a physical space to bridge the technology adoption gap. Linking individuals to relevant digital information is a key step towards personal activation and participation in self-management of health. We are very appreciative for the support and partnership of all our funding partners and our clinical colleagues who helped make this initiative possible.”

(Left to right) James Perez, Dr. Fred Cerise, Steve Miff, Dr. Esmaeil Porsa, Paula Olson, Jessica Hernandez, Stephanie Fenniri, Gretchen Collins, and Vikas Chowdhry at the opening of the PCCI’s Innovation Bridge at Parkland’s Hatcher Station Health Center.

For those not familiar or comfortable with mobile technology available to them, the Innovation Bridge will be staffed by a bilingual Community Technology Liaison who will assist in selection and set up of the right app for each patient’s needs. The person will help guide patients to digital technologies such as MyChart that improve patient engagement, real-time access to personal clinical information, and connections to relevant community resources. An initial list of apps in the following categories has been vetted by PCCI’s team of experts: Asthma, Diabetes, Hypertension, Women’s Health (Pregnancy and Breastfeeding), Mental Health, Pediatric Milestones, Obesity Management, Fitness Tracking and Back Exercises.

“Technology continues to be an essential partner in innovative care delivery at Parkland. As the demand for our services escalates, we are focused on providing the highest possible quality of care to each patient. Innovations like mobile apps empower patients to be full partners with their physicians to assure they receive appropriate medical care and we are pleased to offer the PCCI Innovation Bridge to encourage patients to take advantage of all the resources available to them,” said Fred Cerise, MD, MPH, Parkland’s CEO.

The PCCI Innovation Bridge is located at Parkland’s Hatcher Station Clinic, 4600 Scyene Road, Dallas, 75210. For more information about Parkland, visit www.parklandhospital.com

About PCCI

PCCI is an advanced, nonprofit healthcare analytics R&D organization with a collaborative team of expert data scientists and knowledgeable healthcare professionals that go beyond analyzing a patient’s medical data to provide all-encompassing insights that are revolutionizing healthcare. PCCI is a recipient of more than $50 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland and beyond.

Contact

PCCI
Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications
214-590-3887 lindsey.nace@PCCInnovation.org

14 March 2018

PCCI Announces Members of Scientific Advisory Group




PCCI’s Scientific Advisory Group Comprised of National Healthcare Thought Leaders and Experts

Dallas, TX — PCCI announced the formation of a Scientific Advisory Group (SAG) comprised of 12 nationally known thought leaders and experts in healthcare. The SAG will provide strategic guidance for PCCI and its leadership team to identify innovative advances that address market needs. The group will meet several times per year to discuss innovation, industry trends, market dynamics and the political environment in an effort to drive the clinical innovation and economic success of PCCI and its stakeholders.

“The establishment of the PCCI Scientific Advisory Group is an exciting development in our evolution. It is essential for the achievement of our mission to develop answers to the most pressing problems of improving the healthcare status of the communities that we serve in a more cost-effective method,” said Steve Miff, PhD, President and CEO, PCCI. “The next decade will bring unique models that utilize artificial intelligence and advances in care redesign, We want to be at forefront of this transformation.”

The SAG is chaired by one of PCCI’s Executive Advisors, Valinda Rutledge, MBA, and includes:

    • Kimberly Aston, MBA, Executive Advisor, PCCI
    • Richard D. Daniels, EVP and CIO, Kaiser Permanente
    • Richard Humphrey, MBA, CPA, EVP and CFO, Parkland Health & Hospital System
    • Frederick Isasi, JD, MPH, Executive Director, Families USA
    • Keith Kosel, PhD, MHSA, MBA, VP, Strategic Enterprise Relationships, PCCI
    • Rusty Lewis, CIO and Chief Digital Officer, Southside Specialty Pharmacies
    • Rishi Manchanda, MD, MPH, President and Founder, HealthBegins
    • Thomas Maryon, DHA, VP, Clinical Program Operations, Health Care Service Corporation
    • Steve Miff, PhD, President and CEO, PCCI
    • John S. O’Shea, MD, MPA, MS, Senior Fellow, The Heritage Foundation, Center for Health Policy Studies
    • Michael A. Sachs, MSPH, Chairman, TLSG, Inc.


For more information about PCCI’s Scientific Advisory Group, please visit PCCInnovation.org/scientific-advisory-group

About PCCI
PCCI is an advanced, nonprofit healthcare analytics R&D organization with a collaborative team of expert data scientists and knowledgeable healthcare professionals that go beyond analyzing a patient’s medical data to provide all-encompassing insights that are revolutionizing healthcare. PCCI is a recipient of more than $50 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland and beyond.

Contact
PCCI
Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications
214-590-3887  lindsey.nace@PCCInnovation.org

29 January 2018

Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) Announces New Branding




Updated branding highlights strategic direction; expands sharing of PCCI’s research and innovation

Dallas, TX — PCCI, a nonprofit healthcare advanced analytics research and development organization, is pioneering new ways to health. Starting last year with the hiring of their President and CEO, Steve Miff, PhD, PCCI has expanded its teams. The company’s leadership team now includes Aida Kreho as Vice President of Operations, Vikas Chowdhry as Vice President of Data Strategy and Analytics, and Keith Kosel as Vice President of Enterprise Relationships. They join a growing team of leading clinicians and nationally recognized data scientists. PCCI also updated its strategic direction, and expanded their partnerships in DFW and across the country. The innovation projects resulting from these collaborations are increasingly being highlighted in prominent national publications and conferences. New branding and website designs complement and support these efforts.

“The new PCCI messaging and website are designed to make our work more personable and approachable, and to streamline our ability to collaborate and communicate,” said Steve Miff. “This process involves enhancing our ability to share the models we introduce and the knowledge we generate through our innovation and co-creation processes.”

The PCCI colors have been updated, and the logo has been completely redesigned with elements of both innovation and data, with a slight nod to the original tree. The new website (PCCInnovation.org) is centered around the people, stories, and communities that PCCI serves. PCCI’s bold journey that started with one Parkland patient, continues to aspire to develop new and innovative solutions to deliver individualized, precision health aligned with social care.

Steve Miff, PhD added, “I am excited to not only continue our great progress, but aim to expand our impact to ‘pioneer new ways to health.’ We have a unique opportunity to leverage our expert data scientists and knowledgeable healthcare professionals. Leveraging our partnerships enables us to create connected communities that align resources and drive precision, personalized interventions, and engage individuals in their own health.”

PCCI’s mission to reimagine and expand the knowledge base of healthcare through prescriptive analytics and artificial intelligence, remains the focus. The new branding and website further facilitates the company’s capacity to share their data science, artificial intelligence and predictive model expertise, and bring resources to their partners and the communities they serve.

About PCCI
PCCI is an advanced, nonprofit healthcare analytics R&D organization with a collaborative team of expert data scientists and knowledgeable healthcare professionals that go beyond analyzing a patient’s medical data to provide all-encompassing insights that are revolutionizing healthcare. PCCI is a recipient of more than $50 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland and beyond.

Contact
Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications
214-590-3887
lindsey.nace@PCCInnovation.org

3 January 2018

PCCI Announces New Board Member




Driving Innovation in Data Science and Community Health, Richard D. Daniels, EVP and CIO for Kaiser Foundation Health Plan Joins PCCI’s Board

Dallas, TX — Richard D. Daniels has been appointed to the Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) Board of Directors. Daniels is Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer for Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals.

“We are very honored and fortunate to have Mr. Daniels join the PCCI board. His extensive leadership experience at Kaiser Permanente and across financial sectors will help guide our future innovations in AI and personalized care in areas that are truly pioneering new ways to health for individuals,” said Steve Miff, President and CEO, PCCI.

In his current role Daniels is responsible for the ongoing leadership of Kaiser Permanente’s Information Technology vision, strategy and execution. He is a member of the national executive team. Prior to his appointment as Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Daniels served as senior vice president of Enterprise Shared Services, which includes End User Services, National Facilities Services and National Pharmacy Operations. Daniels joined Kaiser Permanente in May of 2008 as the organization’s Information Technology Senior Vice President and Business Information Officer of Health Plan and Hospital Operations.

“I am truly honored to join the PCCI board,” said Daniels. “PCCI is committed to innovative thinking and to the extremely important work of improving healthcare for the greater benefit of society. I look forward to working with PCCI on some of the major transformational opportunities in healthcare.”

Daniels joins PCCI’s Board of Directors which includes:
Fred Cerise, MD, MPH, President and CEO, Parkland Health & Hospital System
Steve Miff, PhD, President and CEO, Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation
Winfred Parnell, MD, Chair, Parkland Health & Hospital System Board of Managers
Ted Shaw, President and CEO, Texas Hospital Association
Robert L. (Bob) Smith, Healthcare Consultant
Michael Sachs, Chairman of TLSG, Inc.

Ted Shaw, Chairman of the PCCI Board added, “I am thrilled that Richard will be joining our PCCI Board. His intelligence and deep experience will help guide PCCI into the swirling waters of population health and bringing medical communities together to improve the health of millions.”

About PCCI

PCCI is an advanced, nonprofit healthcare analytics R&D organization with a collaborative team of expert data scientists and knowledgeable healthcare professionals that go beyond analyzing a patient’s medical data to provide all-encompassing insights that are revolutionizing healthcare. PCCI is a recipient of more than $50 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland and beyond.

Contact

PCCI

Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications

214-590-3887 lindsey.nace@PCCInnovation.org

27 October 2017

Dr. Steve Miff Awarded Social Innovator of the Year




Dr. Steve Miff Awarded Social Innovator of the Year

The Community Council of Dallas’ Annual Nonprofit and Community Leadership Awards Luncheon Will Honor Local Nonprofit Organizations and Leaders

Dallas, TX – The Community Council of Dallas, has awarded Dr. Steve Miff, the Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation’s (PCCI) President and CEO, with the 2017 Social Innovator of the Year Award. This year’s luncheon will be held on Thursday, November 2.

Ken Goodgames, CEO, Community Council of Dallas said, “Steve has a considerable gift to combine innovative technology approaches with a deep understanding of the social and health challenges we face in Dallas to identify solutions and resolve ongoing community challenges. I consider it a privilege to collaborate with him and his team. His work is game changing!”

Since it’s founding in 1940, the Community Council has identified services that are needed in the community, assessed how services could best be delivered to meet social issues, and mobilized and implemented action plans working in concert with its public sector resources. PCCI’s focus on leveraging artificial intelligence and cognitive computing to create connected communities complements the Community Council’s mission and vision for the community.

“I’m both honored and humbled by this great award and recognition.  It is truly a reflection of the work of the entire PCCI team, and the result of the collaboration with our colleagues at Parkland and across the Dallas community.” added Steve Miff. 

PCCI’s work is improving the health and lives of over 500,000 individuals at Parkland and across the Dallas community.  The Information Exchange Portal (IEP) is one of PCCI’s innovative programs focusing on addressing the health and social needs of a community. The program connects healthcare providers and community based organizations to coordinate the communication and care for individuals. With patients’ consent, providers use the portal to share relevant medical and social information with homeless shelters, food banks, and other nonprofits.


About PCCI


PCCI is an advanced, not-for-profit healthcare analytics R&D organization with a mission to create a world of connected communities where every health outcome is positive. We combine deep clinical expertise with advanced analytics and artificial intelligence to enable the delivery of precision medicine at the point of care. PCCI is a recipient of more than $50 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland Health & Hospital System, and beyond.

Contact
PCCI
Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications
214-590-3887
lindsey.nace@pccipieces.org

1 August 2017

Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) Announces New Board Member




Building its strong Board to drive innovation in healthcare, PCCI appoints Michael Sachs, Chairman of TLSG, Inc.

Dallas, TX — Michael Sachs has been appointed to the Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) Board of Directors. Sachs is Chairman of TLSG, Inc, an investment advisory and consulting firm.

“I am very excited and honored that Michael is joining the PCCI Board. He is a top healthcare executive and visionary, and has been a personal mentor and role model for the last 15 years,” said Steve Miff, PhD, PCCI’s President and CEO. “His passion for transforming healthcare and his insights and guidance will help us expand PCCI’s innovation and impact.”

Sachs has spent his entire career in healthcare with a focus on developing data and information companies. He is working with startups and early stage companies in the healthcare, biomedical and data science fields. He began his career as a paramedic, served as an administrator at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Michigan, and was a consultant at A.T. Kearney and Ernst and Whinney in Chicago.

Sachs earned a Master of Science in Public Health and a Bachelor of Science degrees from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He is active with a number of community organizations including hospitals in Jupiter, Florida, Los Angeles and Chicago. He serves on numerous Boards of Directors of private companies as well as the Board of Directors of The Ounce of Prevention in Chicago.

“I am honored to be able to support PCCI’s mission of improving the delivery of healthcare services to a diverse population through applying innovative techniques of data analysis and precision medicine, “ Sachs said. “The track record of PCCI’s innovations are leading to better delivery of services in Dallas and beyond, a true learning lab for US healthcare. The team led by Dr. Miff is exceptional and recognized by its peers to be one of the best in the nation. I look forward to helping to grow PCCI’s valuable work.”

Sachs joins PCCI’s Board of Directors which includes:

Fred Cerise, MD, President and CEO, Parkland Health & Hospital Systems

Steve Miff, PhD, President and CEO, Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation

Winfred Parnell, MD, an OBGYN and Chair of the Board of Managers at Parkland

Ted Shaw, President and CEO, Texas Hospital Association

Bob Smith, Healthcare Consultant

Ted Shaw, Chairman of the PCCI Board added, “Michael will be a great addition to the PCCI Board. His experience in data analytics and decades of experience serving the healthcare community will be of great value.”

About PCCI

PCCI is an independent, not-for-profit healthcare intelligence organization focused on creating connected communities through data science and machine learning. Our teams combine deep clinical expertise with advanced analytics and artificial intelligence to enable the delivery of precision medicine at the point of care. PCCI is a recipient of more than $45 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland and beyond.

Contact

PCCI

Lindsey Nace, Marketing and Communications

214-590-3887

lindsey.nace@pccipieces.org

12 April 2017

Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation to serve as local ‘hub’




April 12, 2017

Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation to serve as local ‘hub’

One of 32 participants nationwide to link clinical, community services

DALLAS – The Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation (PCCI) has been named a recipient of the CMS Accountable Health Communities (AHC) grant by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The Assistance and Alignment Tracks of the Accountable Health Communities Model will begin on May 1, with a five-year performance period.

PCCI is one of 32 participating sites in 23 states. UT Health Science Center Houston and CHRISTUS Santa Rosa are the only other Texas sites that will conduct and test interventions.

“We are poised to utilize the innovative and transformational capabilities of PCCI in an effort to reduce health disparities in the North Texas region and across the nation,” said Ted Shaw, chair of the PCCI Board of Directors. “PCCI is dedicated to designing solutions that bring together clinical care, public health and community services in a coherent strategy to meet the community’s healthcare needs.”

The grant was designed to specifically address the largest cost drivers that extend beyond the scope of healthcare alone including unmet health-related social needs such as food insecurity and inadequate or unstable housing which may increase the risk of developing chronic conditions, reduce an individuals’ ability to manage these conditions and lead to avoidable healthcare utilization.

“We are very proud that CMS has entrusted PCCI with an Accountable Health Communities Model Grant. This award recognizes the great work PCCI and the Pieces Technologies, Inc. teams have done over the last few years and is a great opportunity for PCCI, Parkland and the Dallas community to expand our mission of creating a world of connected communities where every health outcome is positive,” said Steve Miff, PhD, president and CEO of PCCI.

“We are thankful to our Dallas AHC grant partners, Parkland Health & Hospital System leadership and board, the W.W. Caruth, Jr. and Lyda Hill Foundations for their ongoing partnership, and for the letters of support from Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, the Dallas County Health Department, and Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins,” Dr. Miff added. “We look forward to getting started and partnering with CMS and other leading organizations across the country to improve the health of every community.”

The AHC model was established to test innovative service delivery models and seeks specifically to test whether uniform screening of Medicaid and Medicare beneficiaries at risk for emergency department visits will reduce expenditures and enhance quality of care.

CMS launched the project by announcing the participants for two of the three tracks, the Assistance and Alignment Tracks. PCCI had been awarded the Alignment Track, the most intensive level which includes screening, education, referral, navigation and alignment of community resources to ensure responsiveness to high risk beneficiaries needs.

PCCI will be partnering with five healthcare providers in the Metroplex (Parkland, Methodist, Children’s, Baylor, Dallas Metrocare), 289 community based organizations and Texas Medicaid to design, implement and evalute this model.

To view a list of the assistance and Alignment Tracks bridge organizations in the Accountable Health Communities Model, please visit: https://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/ahcm.

About PCCI:

PCCI is an independent, not-for-profit healthcare intelligence organization focused on creating connected communities through data science and machine learning. It combines deep clinical expertise with advanced analytics and artificial intelligence to enable the delivery of precision medicine at the point of care. PCCI is a recipient of more than $45 million in grants directed at developing and deploying patient centric cutting edge technologies connecting communities, Parkland Health & Hospital System and beyond.

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Contact:

Lindsey Nace
214-590-3887
lindsey.nace@pccipieces.org